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The Ridiculousness of Pumpkin Spice Products

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The Ridiculousness of Pumpkin Spice Products

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Pumpkin spice is a capitalistic epidemic that annually infects products of all kinds come August. That’s right, the flavor stretches far past grocery store aisles. The scent of cinnamon and nutmeg infests every retail space imaginable, harassing the nostrils of nonconformists everywhere. From liquor to pet care to personal hygiene products — you are sure to find some fall spirit in every nook and cranny. 

The pumpkin spice latte made its debut on Starbucks’ menu in 2003. This addition birthed a notorious stereotype that reserved the drink for girls in UGG boots and infinity scarves. Although she initially was mocked for her financial frivolousness, millions of people have now found themselves in her footing. Starbucks sells about 28 million pumpkin spice lattes every year and the flavor’s presence in retail spaces is only growing. Despite coming out 2 decades ago, the flavor is now trendier than ever before, consumer interest in pumpkin spice products grew an astounding 45% between 2019 and 2020. The number of ridiculous products available has rapidly increased and have hit stores earlier than previous years. Here are some of the most atrocious products available this holiday season: 

Even though pumpkin spice has only recently become the signature scent of fall, the flavor has been associated with fall cuisine for much longer. Pumpkin pie is a traditional Thanksgiving dessert whose sweetness embodies the comfort of family. Holiday spirit is at an all time high post-vaccine, this holiday season marks an end to the isolation we have collectively endured. Whether consumers purchase pumpkin spice items for kicks, out of a craving for comfort, or because they’re simply a cult follower of pumpkin spice itself, the prevalence of these novelty products show an excitement for the gatherings that lie ahead. 

These products also suggest that there are people who have money to waste while millions of Americans are still financially struggling as a result of the pandemic. By choosing to buy these products, consumers are missing what the holiday season is really about: community. Instead of participating in this thoughtless consumption, we should direct our funds, no matter how small, to help someone in need. Afterall, the holiday season is not about pumpkin spice Poo Pourri, it’s about community and pursuing the common good. 

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